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In Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco

INTRODUCTION : The role of smoking in risk of death among patients with COVID-19 remains unclear. We examined the association between in-hospital mortality from COVID-19 and smoking status and other factors in the United States Veterans Health Administration (VHA).

METHODS : This is an observational, retrospective cohort study using the VHA COVID-19 shared data resources for February 1 to September 11, 2020. Veterans admitted to the hospital who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and hospitalized by VHA were grouped into Never (as reference, NS), Former (FS), and Current smokers (CS). The main outcome was in-hospital mortality. Control factors were the most important variables (among all available) determined through a cascade of machine learning. We reported adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) from logistic regression models, imputing missing smoking status in our primary analysis.

RESULTS : Out of 8,667,996 VHA enrollees, 505,143 were tested for SARS-CoV-2 (NS=191,143; FS=240,336; CS=117,706; Unknown=45,533). The aOR of in-hospital mortality was 1.16 (95%CI 1.01, 1.32) for FS vs. NS and 0.97 (95%CI 0.78, 1.22; P > 0.05) for CS vs. NS with imputed smoking status. Among other factors, famotidine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) use before hospitalization were associated with lower risk while diabetes with complications, kidney disease, obesity, and advanced age were associated with higher risk of in-hospital mortality.

CONCLUSIONS : In patients admitted to the hospital with SARS-CoV-2 infection, our data demonstrate that FS are at higher risk of in-hospital mortality than NS. However, this pattern was not seen among CS highlighting the need for more granular analysis with high quality smoking status data to further clarify our understanding of smoking risk and COVID-19-related mortality. Presence of comorbidities and advanced age were also associated with increased risk of in-hospital mortality.

IMPLICATIONS : Veterans who were former smokers were at higher risk of in-hospital mortality compared to never smokers. Current smokers and never smokers were at similar risk of in-hospital mortality.The use of famotidine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) before hospitalization were associated with lower risk while uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, advanced age, kidney disease, and obesity were associated with higher risk of in-hospital mortality.

Razjouyan Javad, Helmer Drew A, Lynch Kristine E, Hanania Nicola A, Klotman Paul E, Sharafkhaneh Amir, Amos Christopher I

2021-Oct-25

COVID-19, Machine learning, SARS-CoV-2, Smoking, Veteran, hospitalization, mortality