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In Substance use & misuse ; h5-index 30.0

The study evaluated the moderating role of anxiety and depression symptoms on the association between subscales on the Protective Behavioral Strategies for Pregaming (PBSP) scale (safety and familiarity, setting drink limits, pacing drinking, and minimizing intoxication) and alcohol consumption during pregaming. Methods: Participants were 359 traditional age undergraduate college students (M = 20, SD = 1.37; 61.7% female; 61.2% White) who reported pregaming in the past year. All participants completed measures through an online survey which evaluated PBSP, depression and anxiety symptoms, and alcohol use during pregame events in the past month. Results: Among students with high depression symptoms, the more frequent use of PBSP to minimize intoxication was not associated with alcohol consumption levels, whereas among those with low depression symptoms, higher use of PBSP to minimize intoxication was associated with higher alcohol consumption. Among those with high anxiety symptoms, the more frequent use of PBSP to minimize intoxication was associated with lower alcohol consumption at pregaming events, whereas among those with low anxiety symptoms, the use of this PBSP was associated with higher alcohol consumption. The more frequent use of PBSP related to safety and familiarity among those with high anxiety symptoms was unrelated to alcohol consumption during pregaming, whereas among those low in anxiety symptoms, the more frequent use of this PBSP was associated with lower alcohol consumption. Conclusion: The findings begin to inform clinical care and intervention techniques aimed at reducing harm associated with risky drinking practices among a vulnerable subset of college students.

Hummer Justin F, Davis Jordan P, Christie Nina, Pedersen Eric R

2021-Jul-19

Pregaming, alcohol use, college students, mental health, protective behavioral strategies