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In Critical care explorations

** : Continuous electroencephalogram monitoring is associated with lower mortality in critically ill patients; however, it is underused due to the resource-intensive nature of manually interpreting prolonged streams of continuous electroencephalogram data. Here, we present a novel real-time, machine learning-based alerting and monitoring system for epilepsy and seizures that dramatically reduces the amount of manual electroencephalogram review.

METHODS : We developed a custom data reduction algorithm using a random forest and deployed it within an online cloud-based platform, which streams data and communicates interactively with caregivers via a web interface to display algorithm results. We developed real-time, machine learning-based alerting and monitoring system for epilepsy and seizures on continuous electroencephalogram recordings from 77 patients undergoing routine scalp ICU electroencephalogram monitoring and tested it on an additional 20 patients.

RESULTS : We achieved a mean seizure sensitivity of 84% in cross-validation and 85% in testing, as well as a mean specificity of 83% in cross-validation and 86% in testing, corresponding to a high level of data reduction. This study validates a platform for machine learning-assisted continuous electroencephalogram analysis and represents a meaningful step toward improving utility and decreasing cost of continuous electroencephalogram monitoring. We also make our high-quality annotated dataset of 97 ICU continuous electroencephalogram recordings public for others to validate and improve upon our methods.

Bernabei John M, Owoputi Olaoluwa, Small Shyon D, Nyema Nathaniel T, Dumenyo Elom, Kim Joongwon, Baldassano Steven N, Painter Christopher, Conrad Erin C, Ganguly Taneeta M, Balu Ramani, Davis Kathryn A, Levine Joshua M, Pathmanathan Jay, Litt Brian

2021-Jul

critical care, electroencephalography, epilepsy, machine learning, seizures, software