Receive a weekly summary and discussion of the top papers of the week by leading researchers in the field.

In PloS one ; h5-index 176.0

Elevated postprandial plasma glucose is a risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that the inter-individual postprandial plasma glucose response varies partly depending on the intestinal microbiome composition and function. We analyzed data from Danish adults (n = 106), who were self-reported healthy and attended the baseline visit of two previously reported randomized controlled cross-over trials within the Gut, Grain and Greens project. Plasma glucose concentrations at five time points were measured before and during three hours after a standardized breakfast. Based on these data, we devised machine learning algorithms integrating bio-clinical, as well as shotgun-sequencing-derived taxa and functional potentials of the intestinal microbiome to predict individual postprandial glucose excursions. In this post hoc study, we found microbial and clinical features, which predicted up to 48% of the inter-individual variance of postprandial plasma glucose responses (Pearson correlation coefficient of measured vs. predicted values, R = 0.69, 95% CI: 0.45 to 0.84, p<0.001). The features were age, fasting serum triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, BMI, fasting total serum cholesterol, abundance of Bifidobacterium genus, richness of metagenomics species and abundance of a metagenomic species annotated to Clostridiales at order level. A model based only on microbial features predicted up to 14% of the variance in postprandial plasma glucose excursions (R = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.64, p = 0.04). Adding fasting glycaemic measures to the model including microbial and bio-clinical features increased the predictive power to R = 0.78 (95% CI: 0.59 to 0.89, p<0.001), explaining more than 60% of the inter-individual variance of postprandial plasma glucose concentrations. The outcome of the study points to a potential role of the taxa and functional potentials of the intestinal microbiome. If validated in larger studies our findings may be included in future algorithms attempting to develop personalized nutrition, especially for prediction of individual blood glucose excursions in dys-glycaemic individuals.

Søndertoft Nadja B, Vogt Josef K, Arumugam Manimozhiyan, Kristensen Mette, Gøbel Rikke J, Fan Yong, Lyu Liwei, Bahl Martin I, Eriksen Carsten, Ängquist Lars, Frøkiær Hanne, Hansen Tue H, Brix Susanne, Nielsen H Bjørn, Hansen Torben, Vestergaard Henrik, Gupta Ramneek, Licht Tine R, Lauritzen Lotte, Pedersen Oluf

2020