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In International journal of MCH and AIDS

Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications in medicine have grown considerably in recent years. AI in the forms of Machine Learning, Natural Language Processing, Expert Systems, Planning and Logistics methods, and Image Processing networks provide great analytical aptitude. While AI methods were first conceptualized for radiology, investigations today are established across all medical specialties. The necessity for proper infrastructure, skilled labor, and access to large, well-organized data sets has kept the majority of medical AI applications in higher-income countries. However, critical technological improvements, such as cloud computing and the near-ubiquity of smartphones, have paved the way for use of medical AI applications in resource-poor areas. Global health initiatives (GHI) have already begun to explore ways to leverage medical AI technologies to detect and mitigate public health inequities. For example, AI tools can help optimize vaccine delivery and community healthcare worker routes, thus enabling limited resources to have a maximal impact. Other promising AI tools have demonstrated an ability to: predict burn healing time from smartphone photos; track regions of socioeconomic disparity combined with environmental trends to predict communicable disease outbreaks; and accurately predict pregnancy complications such as birth asphyxia in low resource settings with limited patient clinical data. In this commentary, we discuss the current state of AI-driven GHI and explore relevant lessons from past technology-centered GHI. Additionally, we propose a conceptual framework to guide the development of sustainable strategies for AI-driven GHI, and we outline areas for future research.

Hadley Trevor D, Pettit Rowland W, Malik Tahir, Khoei Amelia A, Salihu Hamisu M

2020

AI Framework, AI Strategy, Artificial Intelligence, Global Health, Implementation, Sustainability