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In Clinical rheumatology ; h5-index 39.0

INTRODUCTION : Machine learning is applied to characterize the risk and predict outcomes in multi-dimensional data. The prediction of radiographic progression in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) remains limited. Hence, we tested the feasibility of supervised machine learning algorithms to predict radiographic progression in axSpA.

METHODS : This is a retrospective and hospital-based study. Clinical and laboratory data obtained from two independent axSpA groups were used as training and testing datasets. Radiographic progression over 2 years was assessed using the modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS) and mSASSS worsening by ≥ two units was defined as progression. Seven machine learning models with different algorithms were fitted, and their performance for the testing dataset was assessed using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) and precision-recall (PR) curve.

RESULTS : The training and testing groups had equivalent characteristics, and radiographic progression was identified in 25.3% and 23.7%, respectively. The generalized linear model (GLM) and support vector machine (SVM) were the top two best-performing models with an average area-under-curve (AUC) of ROC of over 0.78. SVM had the higher AUC of PR compared with GLM (0.56 versus 0.51). Balanced accuracy was over 65% in all models. mSASSS was the most informative variable, followed by the presence of syndesmophyte(s) at the baseline and sacroiliac joint grades.

CONCLUSIONS : Clinical and radiographic data-driven predictive models showed reasonable performance in the prediction of radiographic progression in axSpA. Further modelling with larger and more detailed data could provide an excellent opportunity for the clinical translation of the predictive models to the management of high-risk patients. Key Points • Clinical and radiographic data-driven predictive models showed reasonable performance in the prediction of radiographic progression in axSpA. • Further modelling with larger and more detailed data could provide an excellent opportunity for the clinical translation of the predictive models to the management of high-risk patients.

Joo Young Bin, Baek In-Woon, Park Yune-Jung, Park Kyung-Su, Kim Ki-Jo

2019-Oct-30

Axial spondyloarthritis, Machine learning, Radiographic progression